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Showing posts from January, 2017

Water mixable oil paints review

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"What's not to like about water mixable oil paints?"
Water mixable oil paints have become increasingly popular over the last few years since their development. Many people used to working with traditional oils remain sceptical, especially as we learn from an early age that "water and oil don't mix"! However, leaving the chemistry aside, these paints definitely do mix with water.
For me, I had two reasons for trying them out. Firstly I have a touch of asthma which I believe was being worsened by the solvents used in traditional oils. Secondly, I invite people into my studio to see my work and didn't like having the permanent smell of solvents around. 
Now I have been using them for some time, I won't be changing back. As well as no toxins and smells, they are relatively mess free as brushes are so easy to clean. I clean my brushes by rinsing them and then leaving them in baby oil overnight before rinsing them again. 
Some people mistakenly believe t…

Completing your artwork - "Is it finished?"

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"Art is never finished, only abandoned” Leonardo da Vinci

Although I agree with this concept, I do think we need to know when to “abandon” our artworks and call them “finished”.
I myself am often guilty of overworking paintings. I can become carried away by the process and don't stand back from my work when I should. This can result in too much detail, loosing the sense of spontaneity and expression.
There are three things I use to help me decide when a painting is “complete” :-
Firstly, I was once given this advice....
When you think your work is NEARLY finished, then it is most probably finished” …
This advice is invaluable, when you think your work is looking good and nearly finished LEAVE it to one side for a day or so. When you go back to it with fresh eyes, you will see it quite differently. You may immediately like what you see and confirm to leave it “finished”, or see an area that needs more work or correction.
Secondly, take photographs of your work. Looking through a vi…